The Little Market sources from social enterprises around the globe that employ artisans with disabilities, ensuring these individuals have access to meaningful employment and a stable income.

PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES OFTEN HAVE FEW EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND FACE DISCRIMINATION.

collective humanity

handmade with sustainable materials

Collective Humanity is a community-based, Cambodian social enterprise empowering women who are socially and economically underserved. Cambodia has a long and rich history of weaving. On the walls of Angkor Wat, an ancient temple built over 900 years ago, you will find carvings engraved of women wearing traditional woven garments, which are still worn today. The techniques and traditional Khmer patterns have been in their community for generations. The artisans at Collective Humanity practice traditional Cambodian techniques including weaving and reusing bamboo plants to create sustainable pieces. Collective Humanity provides educational resources, including skills and household finance training, community development workshops, and healthcare programs.

elliefunday

STAB-STITCHING EMBROIDERY

EllieFunDay partners with an artisan group consisting of 40 women working as part of a sewing unit. Many of these artisans are single mothers; some of them have experienced a form of domestic violence or abuse. The artisans have access to job training, fair wages, dignified employment, healthcare, and educational resources.

KENANA KNITTERS

knitting

Located in the agricultural community of Njoro in Kenya, Kenana Knitters works with 580 artisans, the majority of whom are women. The artisans have had few income earning opportunities because of limited access to a formal education and their family responsibilities. By working with Kenana Knitters, they can earn a sustainable income, create long-term economic plans, and take care of their families with a flexible work schedule. Health clinics are run free of charge at Kenana Knitters. The workshop also offers community development workshops, household finance training, literacy programs, and health and hygiene programs.

musee Bath

hand-blending

Based out of Canton, Mississippi, Musee Bath is dedicated to alleviating poverty by creating sustainable job opportunities. The social enterprise supports second chances for individuals who have endured various hardships including incarceration. Musee Bath provides a supportive and encouraging work environment for those in reentry programs, along with access to general and higher education and finance training.

rose ann hall designs

glass etchings

Rose Ann Hall Designs employs artisans, many of whom are living with disabilities, to produce elegantly carved glassware. By promoting traditional Mexican arts, Rose Ann Hall Designs provides on-the-job training, income, as well as an outlet for artistic expression to individuals with few other opportunities. Rose Ann Hall Designs takes great pride in the uniqueness of its artisans and products.

ShemeshFarms

farming + herb-blending

ShemeshFarms empowers young farm fellows living with diverse abilities in Malibu, California. The team of farm fellows and producers works in a supportive, inclusive environment with college students, interns, and volunteers. They can feel empowered to create unique spice blends while implementing eco-conscious practices and reaching a wider audience.

sustainable threads

weaving

Sustainable Threads is a fair trade enterprise that works with more than 10 artisan groups located in India including several tribal spinners groups. Based in one of the most economically underprivileged states in India, these groups provide employment to families in rural India and support farmworkers, yarn spinners, weavers, and sewers. Otherwise, the rural communities would have to engage in distress migration in search of employment. Sustainable Threads is a member of the Fair Trade Federation and is committed to promoting rural development, entrepreneurship, and social justice in the communities where the artisans live and work.